THIS WEEK IN SYRIA: “One of the worst chemical bombings in Syria turned a northern rebel-held area into a toxic kill zone on Tuesday, inciting international outrage over the ever-increasing government impunity shown in the country’s six-year war. It was the worst toxic gas attack since the 2013 attack on a Damascus suburb that killed hundreds of civilians.

Western leaders including President Trump blamed the Syrian government of President Bashar al-Assad and called on its patrons, Russia and Iran, to prevent a recurrence of what many described as a war crime.

Dozens of people, including children, died — some writhing, choking, gasping or foaming at the mouth — after breathing in poison that possibly contained a nerve agent or other banned chemicals, according to witnesses, doctors and rescue workers.”

There is a Christian presence on the ground who chose to stay in the region for such a time as this. These are women and men of long-faith, as well as many new converts since the war started. They continue to attend to this population that has been traumatized by seven years of civil war. Read more…

MEANWHILE, OVER ON THE CONTINENT OF AFRICA: Last week at CT Magazine, Todd Johnson gave us an interesting thought to chew on. Johnson, who is the Associate Professor of Global Christianity and Director of the Center for the Study of Global Christianity at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary estimates that by 2040, half of all Protestants will live in African nations. He also notes as Protestants around the world are celebrating 500 years of history starting in 1517, there is a stunning lack of speakers from the African continent at many of the anniversary celebrations. Read more of his analysis here.

AND IN SUDAN, weary aid workers, pastors, and church workers continue to persevere as conditions worsen by the hour. What happens when intense conflict and insecurity prevents relief agencies from reaching people with life-saving assistance? Our friend @GeoffyPJohnston gives an overview of the crisis that will bring you up to speed quickly, and give you a flavor for the situation on the ground. Use caution – the flavor is bitter, but made sweeter by the sacrifice of Ugandan Christians on the ground, working tirelessly in the settlement camps. I plan to join a handful of our brothers and sisters on the ground in June, so your prayers are greatly appreciated. Read more here.

APRIL IS GENOCIDE AWARENESS MONTH, but spreading awareness of conditions in Sudan and Syria is certainly not limited to the month of April. The International Criminal Court are the ones who mark April as Genocide Awareness and Prevention Month. Joining the global efforts to remember, prosecute and condemn genocide is easy – follow them at @IntlCrimCourt for more information.